Introduction

From the CCC Enrollees Handbook circa 1940:

     THE Civilian Conservation Corps is part of the U. S. Government. It provides jobs for young men who cannot find them elsewhere. It conserves and replenishes the public lands of the country. Hundreds of camps have been set up in forests and parks and on soil eroded farmlands. There are camps in every state, in Alaska and in U.S. island possessions. More than two and a half million boys have lived and worked in these camps since 1933, making $30 a month and sending most of it home to their parents.

     Life in a CCC camp is a different kind of life than most boys have known. An enrollee, as a CCC man is called, does not have his own private room. There is no one to pamper him with tempting dishes when his appetite is off. He lives with 200 other men of his own age, in barracks. They work, play and eat together. Learning to get along with 199 other men without hurt feelings or broken noses is one thing every enrollee must learn while in camp. CCC camp life is a healthful one. It offers many opportunities for self improvement, phsyically, mentally and vocationally. Boys who "can take it" will get much out of the CCC. They well may be proud to belong to such an organization.

     The purpose of this handbook is to tell what the CCC is, how it operates and how all enrolless play a part in its growth and achievement.

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